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How Hawaii Was Made Safe (part one)

From "Pele and Hi'iaka" by Emerson "Legends of the Volcanoes" by Westervelt Collected or suggested by Mary Kawena Pukui Retold by Caroline Curtis in "Pikoi and Other Legends of the Island of Hawaii" published by Kamahameha Schools in 1949. Kenneth Grzesik
http://www.IkeAloha.com - April 8 2012

 Hi'iaka was Pele's younger sister. She was beautiful and brave and Pele loved her dearly. But Hi'iaka was different from Pele. The Goddess of the volcano liked to destroy, but Hi'iaka loved people and wanted to help them. She had girl companions from whom she learned to dance the hula and make leis.

From them she learned the dangers which threatened people on her island of Hawaii. She heard of the giant mo'o, of man-eating sharks, of evil spirits and of a terrible whirlwind which destroyed homes and gardens of men.

"I shall go on a journey," Hi'iaka said. "I shall travel around this island of Hawaii and destroy these evil beings. I shall make Hawaii a safe home for people. Who will come with me?"

Her sisters and brothers did not answer.

"I need a traveling companion," Hi'iaka said again. "Come with me or I will have no one to talk to but my shadow."

Still the brothers and sisters did not answer. As for Pele, she was stirring the fire in her pit and gave no thought to Hi'aika's words.

"Are you afraid?" Hi'iaka asked the others. "Are you afraid to journey around your own island of Hawaii?"

"There are many dangers," one sister said.

"What are you?" Hi'iaka asked. "Are you gods and goddesses or timid people?"

"We have no power against the evil beings who rule Hawaii. You will have no power against them. They will kill you, Hi'iaka."

"Pele will give me power," the young goddess said.

"O Pele" she cried, "Great Goddess of the volcano, Give power to Hi'iaka, Give power to your dearly loved sister, I go to meet the great mo'o, And spirits that live in the forest, Fierce sharks that live in the bays, The whirlwind that lives in the valley, Destroying all in it's path. O Pele, I ask you for power. Give me the power to end all these evils."

Suddenly Pele turned from the fire pit. "I have heard your prayer, O Hi'iaka," she said. "This pa'u has the power of lightning. Take it. And in your hour of need call for help of wind and storm. They will answer, Now go."

(To be continued)

                                                                                                                                                                                                 



 Surrounded by a Spectral Sea   The title "Kauluwela Moku" is derived from two Hawaiian words. Two of the meanings of Kauluwela are glowing and colorful. Moku means island. In combination they mean glowing colorful island. The series of images is an exploration of color.

 The Story of the Hula   Taken from "Hula! New, Easy Self-Teaching Method" by Scotty Guletz (South Sea Scotty) 1956

 How Hawaii Was Made Safe (Part 4)   The final segment in the legend of the goddess Hi'iaka and her companions.

 How Hawaii Was Made Safe (part 3)   Hi'iaka and her companions face Pana'ewa the great mo'o of the forest.

 How Hawaii Was Made Safe (part 2)   A continuation of the legend of Hi'iaka and her quest to rid the island of Hawaii from the evil beings that ruled the island.

 How Hawaii Was Made Safe (part one)   From "Pele and Hi'iaka" by Emerson "Legends of the Volcanoes" by Westervelt Collected or suggested by Mary Kawena Pukui Retold by Caroline Curtis in "Pikoi and Other Legends of the Island of Hawaii" published by Kamahameha Schools in 1949.




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